Present Shock: Power of Social Media

From the book Present Shock

According to research by Microsoft, 75% of human resources departments do online research about their candidates, utilizing search engines, social networking sites, personal blogs, and even photo sharing sites…………

Did someone else snap a photo of you while you were drunk at her party?……

This ends up favoring the past over the present.

….every transient thought or act becomes an indelible public recording. Our resumes are no longer distinct from our dating histories. It’s not just the line between public and private activity that has vanished, but the distance between now and then.

My Thoughts

Wow! I share this idea with my wife and the first thing we both said was thank goodness we are not growing up in these times! This is very real and very scary. It is scary because how good of a job are schools, parents, and communities doing to teach the kids about social media and the long term consequences. I know many kids don’t think that far down the road, but it is our job to help them. Have you ever just done a general search of your kids online via Twitter, Instagram, FB, etc.? Not that you are looking for bad stuff or to get them in trouble, but just to see the world they are living in? I often wonder how the sharing of the things they share will affect their future jobs and careers? Will there be consequences for sharing the adolescent and very real thoughts of middle and high school students online? We all have been through that tough phase of life and thought all the good and bad thoughts that go on during those turbulent years. We were lucky enough to not have a platform to share it with the world. The kids today do and how will that impact them when they are older and wiser?

We live in a day and age where you may learn from your mistakes, but you can never start fresh. Everything is documented. Everything is available for others to find. This will either lead to a new way of thinking and understanding for the future generations where they are all in the same boat together or could have very negative consequences. Only time will tell.

Thoughts?

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We are the product being sold

From the book Present Shock

It’s as if we are slowly connecting everyone to everyone else and everything else. …If everyone in the world is your Facebook friend  then why have any Facebook friends at all? We’re back where we started. The ultimate complexity is just another entropy. Or as Cheryl put it, “everything is everything.”

Later in the book

This is the Facebook reality, in which we operate under the false assumption that we are the users of the platform, when we are actually the product being sold.

Nothing is personal. This may be the hardest lesson for victims of present shock to accept: it’s not about you.

Thoughts?

Interesting concepts as I am working on unplugging a bit more and more over the summer to take a much needed break from the obsession I have with the internet. I carve out a time in the morning and trying to go longer and longer without checking my phone every 10 seconds.

I often wonder if we truly ACCEPT this idea shared above. Or is it more that we just don’t care?

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Present Shock Book Reflection and Thoughts Part 2: Education

From the book Present Shock

….it’s also the quiz show approach now favored by public schools, whose classrooms reward the first hand up. Intelligence is equated with speed, and accomplishment with the volume of work finished. The elementary school where I live puts a leaf on the wall for every book a child reads, yet has no way of measuring or rewarding the depth of understanding or thought that took place–or didn’t.

My Thoughts

I feel torn on this passage. A part of me is angered by this notion of public education and yet I know that it exists. How do we work around this? With class periods of 40-45 minutes and so many standards to get through I don’t know how education gets away from the speed of learning concept. I know that everyone operates at different paces. My son is a prime example. He takes a bit longer, but when he is learning he really wants to understand and absorb the concept and not just rush through. Now, homework is a battle every night in my house so I don’t want to paint some perfect picture, but when he is left to study and learn how to do something in Minecraft he is deliberate and cautious. He has deep understanding. How can we bring that to classrooms of 30 kids in 45 minute blocks? I don’t know the answer.

I have the luxury of working with students of various learning paces and modes of learning and be being able to give them time to work at their pace. It is not always clear cut and easy as they must adhere to deadlines, but when they can work at their pace it is amazing what they can do.

We see more and more push for self paced learning and individualized learning plans. Is it possible to pull this off in the school structures we have today?

His comment about checking for understanding really hit me hard and was a great wake up call to remind myself to make sure I am assessing and promoting the right ideas. I think we have great intentions, but sometimes miss what is really viable and important.

Thoughts?

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Present Shock Book Reflections: Digiphrenia and Multi-tasking

From the book Present Shock

Digiphrenia – the way our media and technologies encourage us to be in more than one place at the same time.

My Thoughts
Mr. Multitasking by ~Windfeld on deviantARTwindfeld.deviantart.com


Interesting concept as humans are the only ones affected by time. We feel so pressed to do so much so fast all the time. We forget that technology has no time constraints. We are trying to adapt to the life of technology instead of merging technology to fit into our cycle and perception of time. Also, research shows that the brain cannot multitask. You can only focus on one thing at a time. Trying to find that proper balance of real world and technology can be difficult.

Later in the book he talks about multitasking and the studies that show that humans cannot do more than one thing at a time. I know I personally find this hard to believe, but when I think about my productive days I am not multi-tasking. I am in a groove where I focus on one thing at a time. How many times have you been on the phone while watching TV or browsing the internet. The phone call gets stale and you get intrigued by the other activity and then you forget you were on the phone and have that moment of panic where you cannot recall what was being shared and pray they don’t ask you a question about what they were talking about?

Exactly my point!

And yet continue to try to do it every single day.

As Douglas Rushkoff states on page 74

If we could only catch up with the wave of information, we feel, we would at last be in the now. This is a false goal. For not only have our devices outpaced us, they don’t even reflect a here and now that may constitute any legitimate sort of present tense.

Thoughts?

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