Tetrix PRIZM Tutorial 3: DC Motors

It is time for another tutorial with the Tetrix PRIZM. We are ready to make things move. Are you ready?
For this activity you will need

  1. PRIZM
  2. USB cable to connect to computer
  3. Arduino software
  4. Battery supply
  5. On/Off switch
  6. DC Gear Motor

If you have not already downloaded the PRIZM library, then please do so as we will be using the example code provided for this challenge.

Step 1: Make sure everything is up and running by double checking that your PRZIM boots up and is ready to go.

Step 2: Pull up the Move_DCMotor sketch from the PRZIM library

Step 3: Wire your DC motor to the PRIZM

Step 4: Manipulate code to meet your needs.

In this video I go into great detail about programming and setting up the motor. I also showcase my own struggles to get a robot to move straight as I believe it is important to share the learning process.

I welcome all questions, feedback, and suggestions for upcoming videos.

Previous Tutorials

Tetrix PRIZM Tutorial 2 – Hello World http://wp.me/p4covo-1J6 

Tetrix PRIZM: Tutorial 1 – Connecting the Battery and Connecting to Arduino http://wp.me/p4covo-1Iy 

Tetrix PRIZM: Overview of the Next Generation of Robotics http://wp.me/p4covo-1Ia

 

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Tetrix PRIZM Tutorial 2 – Hello World

Alright, it is time to do some fun programming with PRIZM. The obligatory first challenge has to be HELLO WORLD. This is just standard programming protocol when starting any new learning with a device.

For this activity you will need

  1. PRIZM
  2. USB cable to connect to computer
  3. Arduino software
  4. Battery supply
  5. On/Off switch

If you have not already downloaded the PRIZM library, then please do so as we will be using the example code provided for this challenge.

Step 1: Your first step is to open up the first sketch in the library called Blink_RedLED

You should see the following code

/* PRIZM Controller example program
* Blink the PRIZM red LED at a 1 second flash rate
* author PWU on 08/05/2016
*/

#include <PRIZM.h> // include the PRIZM library

PRIZM prizm; // instantiate a PRIZM object “prizm” so we can use its functions

void setup() {

prizm.PrizmBegin(); // initialize the PRIZM controller

}

void loop() { // repeat this code in a loop

prizm.setGreenLED(HIGH); // turn the RED LED on
delay(1000); // wait here for 1000ms (1 second)
prizm.setGreenLED(LOW); // turn the RED LED off
delay(1000); // wait here for 1000ms (1 second)

}

 

Step 2: Go ahead on turn on the power to the PRIZM. We need to make sure the device is recognized by the computer and ready to rock and roll.

Step 3: Verify the code.It should be good since it is in the library, but it is a good habit to practice when you start writing your own code.

Step 4: Upload the sketch to PRIZM. Once the orange light stops blinking on the PRIZM you are good.

Step 5: Push the green start button

BOOM! You should see your red light flash off and on.

 

What next?

  1. Can you turn on the green light?
  2. Can you mix and match the red and green?
  3. Can you change the tempo of the lights?
  4. Can you create a pattern on morse code?

Please upload and share your ideas by leaving a comment here or on my YouTube channel

 

As always let me know what you think and what questions you have. Until the next tutorial, keep programming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tetrix PRIZM: Tutorial 1 – Connecting the Battery and Connecting to Arduino

Each week I am hoping to bring you a tutorial of my journey with PRIZM. This is the next robotics controller to hit the market and so far I love it. In the previous episode I shared an overview and unboxing of PRIZM.

In this episode I will be covering some very simple and basic information, but important nonetheless. We will cover plugging in the battery and making sure PRIZM is up and running with the Arduino software. For many of you this is something you can do quickly, but I don’t want to leave anyone behind once we get into the coding.

For this video you will need the following:

  1. PRIZM
  2. Battery wires
  3. On/Off Switch
  4. 12V Battery
  5. USB cable to connect PRIZM to computer

*All items come with the PRIZM except the battery unless you order the Tetrix Max or one similar

You will need to make sure you have a 12 volt NIMH battery pack.

Links for video

https://www.arduino.cc/

http://www.tetrixrobotics.com/prizmdownloads

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Tetrix PRIZM: Overview of the Next Generation of Robotics

PITSCO has finally released their next generation programmable device that I believe is going to push coding, engineering, and STEM experiences for students to a whole new level. According to their website PRIZM is

 

The TETRIX® PRIZM™ Robotics Controller is a fully integrated, programmable brain for your bot that features a variety of motor, servo, encoder, and sensor ports with convenient connectors that enable you to control your robot’s behavior like never before. This controller offers the best of both worlds – a learning tool that is powerful yet easy to use. With PRIZM you can take learning to new heights by creating robots that are smarter, more precise, and as real world as it gets.

 

I have been fortunate enough to have had my hands on a PRIZM for about a month. I have had a chance to code with Arduino and push my knowledge base with coding with this language. I have a chance to test a few sensors, program my robot to move, and begin to think about the benefits of PRIZM with students.

 

I would be a fool if I did not acknowledge that there are a ton of great products out there already. My school uses LEGO EV3 for our robotics classes. My makerspace has Raspberry Pi’s, Sphero’s, 3D Printers, and a host of robots in various shapes and sizes.

 

What I like about PRIZM in comparison to the others are the following components

  1. Plug and Play – it is easy to swap out motors and gears and various components to the PRIZM. This shortens the time to prototype while allowing students to push to higher levels of coding and problem solving.
  2. Arduino based – there are so many resources, tutorials, and guides with Arduino that the sky truly is the limit(and even then the sky may be pushed to new boundaries) when it comes to student potential. Teachers won’t have to create it all as there is already plenty to be created. What will be developed next by your students?
  3. TETRIX MAX – being compatible with this kit and just TETRIX in general really opens the door to build a wide variety of projects. These pieces are almost universal anymore and to be able to build with these parts and expand with everyday materials makes it a great choice

I know this post reads like a sales pitch. This is not the intention. This is my excitement. I recently placed PRIZM in the hands of my students and we are already developing some crazy ideas.

 

Here is a quick unboxing and overview video

 

Be sure to check their website out to read all the specs and what is to come.

 

As we plan to roll out a series of videos and tutorials with PRIZM we would love to know what you want to learn. Leave us a comment with your questions and ideas and we will work to experiment and give you the answers you seek.

 

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